Different Types and Causes of Blindness

Types and Causes of Blindness

When it comes to eyesight, no one wants to ever go blind. Let’s dig deep into the different types and causes of blindness.

Blindness is the inability to see anything with your eyes, even light. This loss in vision could be due to an injury or accident. A person with partial blindness has limited vision. 

It must be noted that the term blindness is used in the relative form and for a person with visual impairment or low vision.

Causes of Blindness

The commonly known causes of blindness can be Glaucoma, age-related macular, degeneration corneal opacities, deficiency of Vitamin A, retinopathy of prematurity, vascular diseases involving the retina or optic nerve. Other possible reasons may include stroke, ocular inflammatory disease, retinitis pigmentosa (a genetic disorder in which retina is unable to respond to light), primary or secondary malignancies of the eye congenital abnormalities, hereditary diseases, and chemical poisoning from toxic agents, such as methanol. Some of these are treatable or preventable with timely examination and treatment.

There are three common other types of blindness:

Color blindness, night blindness, and snow blindness. In which special visual function are deprived but the patient can perform his daily activity in normal light.

Types of Blindness

The causes of all these types differ from each other.

  • Color blindness – is the inability or difficulty to perceive different shades of colors, specifically red and green. This is a genetic disorder and affects men more, as compared to women. People with color blindness do not have vision loss but lack of sense of color.
  • Night blindness – refers to the difficulty of seeing in low and dim lights. Night blindness can be both genetic and acquired. The eye functions well in proper day-light or illuminated areas. This is not a case of complete blindness.
  • Snow blindness – is the loss of vision when exposed to ultraviolet light. This is a form of temporary blindness caused by swelling of cells in the corneal surface.

Another type of blindness is congenital blindness in which a person is born blind. It usually happens when the organ is not developed properly or due to some complications during pregnancy. In either of the cases, the person is born blind and cannot see due to underdeveloped organs.

Most cases of acquired blindness can be treated to a great extent. Let Shinagawa Eye Center help save your precious eyes, before it’s too late.

For inquiries, questions, and appointments, call our Patient Care Lines: 

(+63) 917 862 7454

(+63) 921 217 0517

(+632) 7-368 5238

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Is it Safe to Rinse your Eyes with Tap Water

Is it Safe to Rinse your Eyes with Tap Water?

Our eyes are among our body’s most essential and sensitive organs. They can be exposed to different irritants, such as dust, smoke, and allergens, which can cause discomfort, redness, and even infections.

As a result, many people turn to rinsing their eyes but the question is: how safe is it to rinse your eyes with tap water?

Is it Okay to Rinse Your Eyes with Tap Water?

The safety of rinsing your eyes with tap water mostly depends on whether or not you wear contact lenses.

Water from your sink may be fine for those who do not wear contact lenses. If you get a foreign object or irritating chemical in your eye, washing your eyes with fresh water can help remove the substance and reduce discomfort. Remember to tilt your head so that the affected eye is down to avoid accidentally flushing the object into the other eye. 

On the other hand, rinsing the eyes with tap water is not recommended for contact lens wearers. Tap water often contains microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses, and amoebae, that are usually harmless but can cause severe eye infections like acanthamoeba keratitis under certain circumstances. Contact lenses can trap these microorganisms against the eye’s surface, increasing the risk of disease. If you’re wearing contacts, you must avoid exposing your eyes to regular water, including while showering or swimming. If you need to rinse your eyes for any reason, it’s recommended to use a sterile saline solution or contact lens solution specifically formulated for use on the eyes.

If your eyes are feeling dry, a lubricant like natural tears can help soothe dry eyes more effectively than water. Speak to your eye care professional for more information.

How to Properly Rinse Your Eyes

In case of an emergency, such as a foreign object, chemical, irritant or burn in the eye, here’s how to rinse your eyes:

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water to avoid introducing germs into your eyes.
  • Use sterile saline or contact lens solution, specifically formulated to be safe for use on the eyes, and flush your eyes with it. 
  • If you don’t have saline or contact lens solution, you can use clean, lukewarm water. Avoid using very cold or hot, as it can be uncomfortable or even harmful to your eyes.
  • Tilt your head back, open your eyes, and pour the solution or water into the inner corner of your eye, letting it flow across your eye and out of the outer corner. If the irritant is only in one eye, tilt your head with the affected eye down, to avoid flushing the object into the other eye.
  • Repeat the process until your eye feels better, but avoid rubbing or touching your eyes with your hands or a cloth.

When to See an Eye Doctor

If you experience any of the following symptoms, you should see an eye doctor as soon as possible:

  • Severe pain or discomfort in your eyes
  • Dry eyes
  • Blurred or decreased vision
  • Redness, swelling, or discharge from your eyes
  • Sensitivity to light
  • A foreign object stuck in your eye that you can’t remove

These symptoms may indicate an eye infection, condition, or injury that requires prompt treatment to prevent complications. 

If you experience any unusual symptoms or discomfort in your eyes, don’t hesitate to consult an eye doctor for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

For inquiries, questions, and appointments, call our Patient Care Lines: 

(+63) 917 862 7454

(+63) 921 217 0517

(+632) 7-368 5238

Talk to our Consultants via Livechat: https://shinagawa.ph/

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Autoimmune Disease & Dry Eye

Autoimmune Disease & Dry Eye

Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders that result in the body’s immune system attacking itself. There are over 80 types that impact different parts of the body and result in a variety of symptoms. A common condition associated with several autoimmune diseases is dry eyes.

Dry Eye Syndrome: What Is It?

Dry Eye Syndrome (DES) occurs when the eyes don’t produce enough tears, or when the tears evaporate too quickly due to a lack of the oils needed for sufficient lubrication. This makes the eyes dry, red, itchy and irritated. 

DES is often caused by environmental factors, like being exposed to dry wind and air, not blinking enough while looking at a digital device or while reading, and comedogenic makeup — but it can also result from an underlying autoimmune disease.

Left untreated, dry eye syndrome can result in chronic eye inflammation and even corneal ulcers and permanent vision loss, in severe cases. 

Why Do Autoimmune Diseases Cause Dry Eyes?

Autoimmune diseases can disrupt the normal functioning of the tear glands by prompting the immune system to mistakenly attack them. Treating the autoimmune disease can often help alleviate dry eye symptoms. At the same time, some medications used to manage autoimmune disease symptoms, like anti-inflammatory medication, may actually exacerbate DES.

Types of Autoimmune Disease That Cause Dry Eye

Here are some common autoimmune diseases that raise the risk of developing DES: 

  • Sjogren’s Syndrome: This multifaceted condition often coexists alongside other autoimmune diseases. While it can affect almost any part of the body, it’s best known for targeting the tear and salivary glands, leading to a chronically dry mouth and eyes.
  • Lupus: This systemic autoimmune disease affects different parts of the body, including the eyes, causing dry eye and other eye problems.
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis: In addition to inflamed joints, rheumatoid arthritis can affect the eyes. In fact, the autoantibodies that target your joints can target the eye’s glands and other structures.
  • Thyroid Eye Disease: The immune system can cause inflammation in the tissues around the eyes and trigger dry eye syndrome.
  • Type 1 Diabetes: High blood sugar can affect the eye’s ability to produce tears and speed up tear evaporation. In addition, it can damage the eye’s nerves, making it difficult for the eyes to know that they’re dry and need to produce tears. 

These are just a few examples of autoimmune diseases that can cause dry eye. It’s important to see an eye doctor if you’re experiencing symptoms of dry eye syndrome, and mention any autoimmune disease in your medical history. 

Shinagawa provides care for Dry Eye Syndrome (DES) resulting from autoimmune disease and other causes.

For inquiries, questions, and appointments, call our Patient Care Lines: 

(+63) 917 862 7454

(+63) 921 217 0517

(+632) 7-368 5238

Talk to our Consultants via Livechat: https://shinagawa.ph/

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Causes and Treatment of Watery Eyes

Causes and Treatment of Watery Eyes

A watery eye is a condition where too many tears are produced or when the tears cannot drain away properly. The prevalence rate of the disease is 8.60%. 

Any person can have watery eyes; it is not an age-specific condition built mostly occurs in babies and people of the age group 60 and above.

Causes of Watery Eyes

There can be numerous causes of watery eyes, including problems in the eye glands that secrete an oily substance, which keeps the eyes lubricated. Sometimes the glands do not function properly, resulting in dry patches in the eye. These dry patches might produce extra tears as a reflex action.

Other commonly known causes of watery eyes are: lower eyelid dropping inward or outward, making it difficult for the tears to reach tear ducts, eye irritation, or an eye infection such as conjunctivitis. Inflammation in the eyelids, also known as blepharitis, can cause watery eyes.

Treatment of Watery Eyes

The treatment will depend on the symptoms and causes of the watery eyes. The eye doctor will check for any blockage in tear ducts and will prescribe eye drops to control inflammation, irritation, and pain in the eyes. A doctor may also carry out scans and X-rays of your tear ducts to have a deeper and clearer picture of the situation. It is also advisable to not wear contact lenses when having watery eyes.

The eye doctor may also advise you not to use any make-up on the sensitive skin, as it can further deteriorate the condition. If watery eyes are because of dry eye syndrome, the eye doctor will advise you to take eye drops to lubricate your eyes. If it is caused due to a bacterial or fungal infection, the doctor might give you ointment and eye drops to help in the quick recovery of the eye.

We, at Shinagawa, understand that the smallest of problems like watery eyes can bring along anxiety and concern. Let our experienced doctors help!

For inquiries, questions, and appointments, call our Patient Care Lines: 

(+63) 917 862 7454

(+63) 921 217 0517

(+632) 7-368 5238

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Complications and Management of Eye Infections

Complications and Management of Eye Infections

What causes an infection in the eyes?

Infections of the eyes are most commonly caused by viruses, bacteria, and/or fungus. These germs are omnipresent, even on our skin. Hand-to-eye contact (especially while eye rubbing) allows bacteria to enter eyes where they don’t belong, leading to infection.

Types of Eye Infections

Conjunctivitis 

Pinkeye is a contagious eye disease. Conjunctivitis is a conjunctiva infection that causes your eyes to turn pink. A bacteria or a virus may cause it. It is contagious!

Keratitis

This is an infection of the cornea caused by bacteria, viruses, fungus, or parasites found in water. It is more common amongst contact lens wearers. It is NOT contagious.

Stye

It usually appears as painful red lumps on eyelids or at the base of your lashes. Severe cases can lead to lid swelling. It is NOT contagious.

Cellulitis

Cellulitis is a fungal and bacterial condition that affects the skin. It has the potential to harm the skin and eyes. Preseptal and orbital are two types of cellulitis. It is NOT contagious.

Endophthalmitis

An infection of the fluid or tissue within the eye is known as endophthalmitis. It requires urgent medical attention, otherwise, it may result in blindness.

Fungal eye infections

Infections caused by fungi are rare, but they may be dangerous if they occur. If you use spectacles but don’t clean them correctly, you may develop one.

Following an eye injury, several fungal eye infections develop. The symptoms of a fungal eye infection may emerge anywhere from several days to weeks after the fungus enter the eye. 

A fungal eye infection has symptoms that are similar to those of other kinds of eye infections (such as those caused by bacteria) and may include:

  • Pain in the eyes
  • Redness in the eyes
  • Vision is blurred
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Excessive Tearing

Only an eye specialist can tell you what type of infection you have in your eyes. 

Book an appointment with some of the country’s most experienced eye specialists at Shinagawa clinics.

For inquiries, questions, and appointments, call our Patient Care Lines: 

(+63) 917 862 7454

(+63) 921 217 0517

(+632) 7-368 5238

Talk to our Consultants via Livechat: https://shinagawa.ph/

Instagram: https://instagram.com/shinagawa_ph/